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me hot the lead investigator is? >> off the top of my head, no. >> the fbi still not investigating the irs controversy aggressively. that's the charge from a conservative watchdog group. but is it true? we'll tell you what we know. >> talk about terrorists, then don't just talk about people with brown skin. >> bill: under heavy pressurey the far left the fbi removes some anti-terror ads designed to protect americans. we'll tell you bawl that. >> you don't have to wait until you are almost dead before you can defend? >> no. i was advised you don't do that caution, you are about to enter the no spin zone. the factor begins right now. bill o'reilly, thanks for watching us tonight. the fbi and the irs. that is the subject of this evening's talking points memo. a conservative group called the american center for law and justice says that the federal bureau of investigation has not even contacted, has not even contacted any of the 41 groups involved in the class action suit against the irs. as you may know, the federal tax agency admits it targeted some conservative organizations and ind
allowed them to be in our apartment, lest the fbi swoop down and get them. that was my nightmare. i had a number of copies stashed with different people, so i could say, even from jail, you know, "ok, get that one out or get this out," with my ten- cent call that i was allowed, that they couldn't stop it. but i never allowed it to be in my apartment. for once, i had it there because - and mike did not even know this - because i intended to communicate with his office on monday to go to washington, not knowing they were coming out in the times, and offer this thing to this man who was conducting the filibuster. so i was quite shocked to learn from a friend in the times that the building was locked down. they were worried about an fbi raid and an injunction, because they were copying this seven - they were putting out this big study, which i hadn't been told. so i go, "well, that's very interesting." and meanwhile, i had these papers in my apartment. the fbi might come any minute, and i had already had a scheduled meeting with howard zinn that night, with our families - his wife and my wi
's fbi. >> doj. >> yes. >> the department of justice. >> that's correct. and we also representation from u.s. secret service. we have representation from intelligence communities. i am not allowed to spell out the names. >> it's another acronym, shall we say? >> yes. multiple community agencies are also sending representation for this sense of group. >> indeed you are here, are you not, with special permission of the fbi legal counsel? >> yes, sir. the counsel of the fbi allowed me to testify for this in particular case. >> and as a result, in fact, the scope of your testimony is somewhat limited. if either mr. manti or i were to ask you questioning that may be protected for security reasons or outside the scope of this case. >> that is correct. >> is your fbi lab a forensic lab? >> yes. >> and i want to just have you address that for a moment. the jury may not know what forensic means. in the context of the work that you do. i'll summarize it, or you correct me. that it's with a focus towards evaluating evidence for possible use in a courtroom setting. >> narrow definition and broad def
does the fbi. most of it in the private sector with the critical infrastructure. what we're trying to do is create a safe harbor for the sectors can come together with the federal government with a civilian interface. a civilian interface with the private sector which is groups like that so they can come together with protection and antitrust protection and share this information across sector lines. currently, they cannot shared the information with each other in the private sector. it has to be a shared relationship, industry driven. we are moving forward. we are looking at how the executive is being implemented. impetus toive us have oversight hearings of what they are doing wrong and how to rein in the executive order. and ultimately, how we can fix the system. every day that goes by that we do not pass the bill, we put americans at risk. i do not want to be the member who did not get it done with something bad happened. and it is too late. there's a lot of momentum in the congress. more than i have seen. i've been involved for over a decade. i have never seen this type of mome
as a defense voice analyst expert for the fbi during a separate hearing. don't know exactly what he's going to testify about but we suspect we do. let's listen. >> my name is hirotak. last name is nakasone. currently i'm assigned to the operational technology division of the fbi. and performs variety of duties as a senior scientists. i conduct research and development activities for the development of speaker recognition systems. i perform voice related examine nations and speak analysis and acoustic analysis and gunshot analysis. lastly, as a senior scientist i provide advice, guidance, recommendations for the operational technology divisions in other fbi field office. >> how long have you been in your current position? >> since 2009 as a senior scientist for four years and prior to that i was hired in the seminole position since 1996. >> tell the ladies and gentlemen of the jury essentially what it is you've done, how long you've been in this field and what makes you qualified to hold your current position. >> when i was doing my phd at michigan state university i got into this forensic s
financial security data mining is. the senator points so we already have so much stated that the fbi misses. >> we can't seem to keep up with the people we have been told about. the underwear bomber. his dad turned demand. we cannot keep up with them. he got on a plane. they think somehow there will go through billions of bits of information every day. john: was your answer to that? >> here is a glorious thing. we're not going through these billions of things every day. the collection of phone records that edward snowden has talked about is not being used for data mining. there being used when they're is a specific terrorist case that we can identify and say, we think we have information that leads us to want to get checked these phone records. it is not the case that we're constantly data mining. very specific uses of information with approval by the fisa court. i guess my last thought is this, no program is going to catch them all. there is no way you can ever create a perfect system and cash every single incidents of terrorism, but thess programs have been important and effective and are
that courtroom as we hear from the fbi senior audio electronics engineer. today's first witness. >> speech analysis, and acoustic analysis of signals we encounter, including gunshots analysis. and lastly, also as a senior scientist, i provide advice, guidance, recommendations for the operational technology divisions, in the fbi field office. >> doctor, how long have you been in your current position? >> since 2009. as a senior scientist, for four years. and prior to that, i was also hired in a similar position since 1996. >> tell the ladies and gentlemen of the jury essentially what it is that you have done, how long you've been in this field, and what has made you sort of qualified to hold your current position. >> well, initially, when i was doing my ph.d. and thesis at michigan state university, i got into this forensic recognition as part of my thesis. and when i graduated with the ph.d. degree, i taught at michigan state as a professor for 18 months or so. and after that, i moved to los angeles county sheriff department in los angeles, california, to take up a federal research project
passed the senate with bipartisan support. nancy cordes on what this means. a former f.b.i. agent testifies that he took bribes from boston mobster james "whitey" bulger. bulger had a few choice words of his own. don dahler was in the courthouse. major garrett breaks news with the president in the hunt for the man revealing america's secrets. >> reporter: mr. president, will you use u.s. military assets to in any way intercept mr. snowden? >> pelley: and paul lopez put his life on hold to fight for his country. carter evans reports 69 years later he's gone back in time to live his dream. captioning sponsored by captioning sponsored by cbs with scott p this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. >> pelley: good evening. a nation of immigrants tonight is one step closer to creating a path to citizenship for 11 million immigrants who are living here illegally. the senate this afternoon approved a sweeping overhaul of immigration laws. by a vote of 68-32. 14 republicans joined every democrat in voting yes. in addition to offering the hope of citizenship,
. senator rand paul points out that we already have so much data that the fbi misses tips they have, like the tip about the boston marathon bombers and others. >> we can't seem to keep up with the people we've been told about. remember the underwear bomber, his dad turned him in. we couldn't keep up with him. he still got on a plane. yet we think they're going to go through billions of bits of information every day? >> what's your answer to that? >> john, here's the glorious thing. we're not going through these billions of bits every day. this collection of phone records that mr. snowden talked about are not used for data mining. they're being used when there's a specific terrorist case we can identify. we say hey, we think we've got information that leads us to check phone records. it's not the case that we're constantly data mining and going through billions of records. is there specific use of this information always with court approval. that's what the americans would expect. my last thought is it. no program is going to catch them all. there's no way to create a system that's perfect
points out we have so much data the fbi mrs. tips like the boston marathon bombers and other. >> we cannot keep up with the people we have been told about remember the underwear bomber? his dad turned him in andy thinks of how they will go through billions of bits of information everyday? john: what is your answer? >> we're not going through these every day. the collection of the phone records have not been used for data mining but if there is a specific terrorist case we can identify to say we have information to you checked the phone records records, it is not a case to constantly data mind they are a specific uses it is a program of their kitchens would expect. no program will katchis all. i will catch every single instance of terrorism but they have an important and effective and are critical to rounding out the nation's apparatus. john: thank you congressman. coming up, libertarians are mad at me and some call me disgusting and calmly a libertarian in name only but the government intrusion i really am about the irs that has the wrong ideas. >> wired they in my kitchen? >> conse
interview but not helping her cause. we'll show you why. >> do you know where your car is tonight? new fbi numbers are showing cars are disappearing across the bay area. the five cities that top the list. which ones and what you need to watch out for. >>> what can you do to prevent it? the fbi is calling it an epidemic. car thefts, cars are disappearing in record numbers. we have the new information about this wide-spread problem, george? >> reporter: well, raj, last year was a pretty rough year for autos around the bay area. cars are being stolen from the curb, driveways and parking lots like this one in san jose and tonight we talk to one woman whose christmas day was ruined because someone stole her car. >> the car was gone. it was just gone. >> reporter: margaret knows what it's like to have her car stolen. it happened to her on christmas day last year. >> around 10:0 0 in the morning i went out to get presents to put them under the tree and the car was gone. >> reporter: the presents in the trunk and her cd collection gone. >> it's really sort of a stunned feeling. >> reporter: she wa
. the fbi has a role to play. they did a great job. we know these streets. they never talked to us about this case. he never told us about the russian warning. they were not briefed on the fbi investigation. they do not know anything about the case. he was embarrassed by that. the state police can play a role. why not have a whole force multiplier? that is the failure here. they failed to discuss this with the local police. we always talk to the local police about matters. fix thisa way to process. let's face it. 12 years after 9/11, we cannot coordinate effectively. we know either the fbi knew and did not do anything or what makes clear that they did not do anything about it. when you look at in the context of the russian letter, i think when he came back he would have taken a second look. if they did, they would have seen these websites be put up. came back radicalized. we possibly could have stopped it. >> i want to ask you really quickly about a texas , wholator, wendy davis did a filibuster. i want to get your thoughts on her and what is going on down there for those not familiar wi
and the miami beach office, the fbi office in north miami beach. well, the question was how do seven men declare ground war on the united states of america, and then i realized there was an informant involved. these men didn't have a connection to al-qaeda, the connection was an undercover fbi informant who was posing as an al-qaeda operative, and that was their only connection to terrorism at all. so i did my stories when i was in miami, and over time i realized there were more and more cases being announced and they all had this similar pattern. people involved were involved in these fantastical plots to bomb subway stations or office buildings, be i they never had the means to acquire weapons, and those weapons were provided by an undercover fbi agent posing as an affiliate of some sort. so right around 2010 i began to question how can we figure out how many of these cases have existed since 9/11? how many of the hundreds of terrorism prosecutions since 9/11 were involving real terrorists or those involving people that had no capacity of their own? so i had applied for every year every year t
whitey bulger and a corrupt fbi agent bubbled up in court thursday. prosecutors complained that bulger cullalled their star witness a a, quote, blanking liar during testimony. the witness is john morris, a disgraced former fbi supervisor. he admits taking cash and wine from bulger while bulger worked as an informant on the italian mob. rikki klieman is a cbs news analyst. good morning. there's quite a history between these two guys. what exactly is the connection? >> well the history is really bad blood. there's no one that whitey bulger hates more. whitey bulger has been clear since the day he was captured in letters as well as in statements that he things morris should be in prison. for any of us who have followed this case from the very beginning, and i'm going back into the '70s, the '80s and when whitey became a fugitive in the '90s, if there is anybody who ought to be in prison above them all, i say it's john morris. >> explain for everybody who's not following it as closely this fbi agent, morris what he was doing. he was getting cases of wine with cash at
's an fbi agent, he figures things out. hey. what's going on? fbi work. does this fbi work have anything to do with pelant? pelant-- he doesn't exist. no, we're looking at a killing done by an individual who manifests a malignant antisocial personality disorder. it helps to pull up old cases to compare, that's all. thank you for the insight. i run the major crimes here, and i'm investigating one, so... caroline: i'd hate to have to drop a report on the h.e.'s desk that you were getting in the way. that sort of politics appalls me. fine. seeley, run your investigation. it's just that, if i were you, i'd want all the help that i could get. but i'm not you. i did some reconstructions. wow, three sets. yeah, since there's no mandible, there's just an element of uncertainty here. brennan: these lesions on the scapula are most likely the remnants of a case of cutaneous leishmaniasis. saroyan: well, that's not a domestic disease. but i've seen it on soldiers. the troops in iraq get it from sand flea bites. montenegro: oh, well, that makes sense. hodgins thinks the metal fragments you gave him a
f.b.i. informant as well as a drug lord feared on the streets of south boston in the 1970s and 1980s. convicted drug dealers, bookers have been called to the stand, so have sons, daughters, siblings and girlfriends of those allegedly murdered by bulger and the mob. kevin colin, a reporter and columnist for the "boston globe" has been there for all of it. he's the co-author of a book about the story. tell us about the most powerful testimony you have been listening to. >> judy, i think it's interesting because obviously a lot of the people that have testified against whitey bulger are from the wrong side of the tracks. they're criminal themselves. there is a corrupt fibe agent f.b.i. agent named john morris who spend spent a guy days own stand. the hit man who was on the stand for several days i described in one of my columns after the first few days of testimony we were hit by punishing rain. he's such a venal and vile man convicted of murdering 20 people that it was almost as if there was a higher power that needed to wash us of our having to listen to this guy. but i think the most
. and the fbi came on and i thought, that is the story of the twa flight. and it just struck a chord with me soon as he began looking at this, they brought in one of the theories, those who had approached the aircraft. lou: were the revelations after so many years to convince you that this was really a worthy investigations. >> welcome to the eyewitness account. these are the individuals who actually handled the investigation. it presents forensic evidence and the eyewitnesses and the eyewitnesses account that dovetails with the present evidence. yonkers welcome it takes years to come to the conclusions. then to have so many unresolved issues that you documented -- what are your own conclusions? were your conclusions at the end of the day? >> first of all, we disapproved of the original. by using the radar data. it dovetails with the witness evidence. the data recorded the explosion. it is just incredible. stories like this can go on and on. lou: did you find out why? a lot of the people were investigators and government employees smack the back stories that the fbi came and very early. it w
will do something about this? >> particularly in light of the fbi's response. just a week and a half ago, i asked the director of the fbi, who is heading up the investigation? you would think something of this magnitude. he didn't know. he didn't know how many people on the case. something of this concern to the united states, you would put your best lawyer, best investigative team. >> how about just anybody? >> he couldn't tell me, which underscores the lack of focus and priority that this must have at the fbi. what scares me more about this than anything else. the same fbi visited tea party people last year and the year before when they were applying for the tax exempt status. that's an irs question. what's the fbi doing showing up at people's door, applying for tax exempt status. when in america did you get a friendly visit from the local fbi agent when you were simply saying i want to apply for tax exempt status. chilling and scary as it gets. >> that proves my point more. time for a special prosecutor. the attorney general, boss of the fbi, apparently look wheat happening, nothing.
. that was dangerously close to libel. our top story, last week weld y told you about the coming man who says an fbi faces ofe globalism was offensive to muslims. tonight kind of joke we won't be hearing during tonight's show. and taco bell tests new branding for its product replacing the word neat with protein as in, man, that taco bell protein just made me sick. >> thank you. it will be a challenge doing this anthony wiener segment sense we have paul mccurio. >> i know. it is never going to happen of. >> it is not going to happen. it will go to predictable, stupid puns. >> we can drop those out and it will be like he was never on the show. >> and it will be three minutes and we will have to put stuff in there like a funny comedian. >> do you want to help here? >> we will welcome the guests no i. lets -- now. let's go. >> her day job is getting bad men off. and at night the same thing. i am here with defense attorney remi spencer. you look delightful. and he is one of the greater comics of his generation. but bill cosby was busy so we got this guy, paul mccurio. and join the dozens of fans who chec
happened what else could explain the brain lapse from the fbi director who could not occur of the person leading the inquiry? >> to know who is heading up the case or the lead investigator? >> get this century do not. >> could you get that information i would like to know how many peop you have assigned to look into this situation. >> i have not had a recent briefing as to where we are. >> you don't know who is leading the case? >> i do not. >> have you talked to any of the victims of the group's targeted? any tea party blocs since may 14th, 2013? back i do not know the status of the intravenous. neil: you said itwould be a full frontal attacks and maybe the administration is not in raged at all to have no interest whatsoever to get to the bottom of the i.r.a. scandal because one month after the president promised to get to the bottom the agency created under his watch is now a bigger mess. clearly he is not interested to fix this maybe we should consult him of the responsibility to get a prosecutor who will. to the man who is representing a dozen tea party groups your phone is not ringi
was being followed everywhere he went by the fbi because they discovered that he was involved in communist party activities, including the possible supplying to the soviet consulate in san francisco with secret material, and so he was followed everywhere so the fbi guy, when this photographer took this picture, went up to the street photographer and said i'll have that film, thank you very much. so this picture was put on the file of all of these people. they knew who -- this picture enabled them to identify joe wineberg, david brohm and max freedman, and consequently all four of them found it impossible to find secure employment. they would be puzzled by the fact they would be offered a job and then it would be withdrawn a few months later, and it was because they had been marked by the fbi as potential subversives. as by this time was oppenheimer himself. the fbi started their own file on oppenheimer during this period, which became absolutely massive. one of the thing us spent a lot of time doing in my research on the book was going through the fbi file, which you can have access to now
. >> reporter: a senior fbi audio expert testified the scream whch lasted about three seconds is not long enough to identify. but during his testimony, the fbi expert said it may be easier for someone familiar with the voice to identify it. legal experts said the prosecution wants jurors to hear that before they gaul martin's mother to the stand. >> miss fulton can come in and basic say i've heard his screams. those are his screams. >> reporter: the defense argues the voice is zimmerman's. susan mcginnis, cbs news, sanford, florida. >>> an unmanned russian rocket made a very short trip with an unscheduled stop. the rocket lifted off from its launchpad in kazakhstan early this morning but then quickly veered off course, rotated, fell apart in midair and crashed near the launchpad. no, no one was injured. the rocket was carrying three navigation satellites. a russian news agency said the burning rocket fuel on the pad may pose an environmental threat, though. >>> straight ahead in "moneywatch," a jury draws a verdict in the case of a man facing jail time for drawing on the sidewalk with chalk. yea
with beards. some express fear for their safety. and now the campaign is caput. an fbi special agent said it is a result of our continued engagement with the community and the feedback we are getting. they released a new ad that is less hurtful and more hopeful. >> ♪ >> why is paul mccurio semisuccessful and that person on secure when that person brings joy and pleasure to everyone's life? don't answer that. i have a real question. are you surprised by the reaction? i am sadenned, but i am not surprised. >> unfortunately and i think the affect of the obama administration on the fbi is now demonstrated through what they have done. it is not a question of the impression the ad leaves with you, but it is the facts of what the ad conveys. in new york they have the famous saying, if you see something, say something. now when you see something you are not supposed to say something if it would leave an impression. >> if you see something, seattle. you know what i am saying? >> i thought it was if you see something, spray something. >> apparently is if you see something, say something. unless i
on the fbi's promised investigation into irs targeting of conservative and religious groups for special scrutiny. critics say there is no investigation. here is karl rcameron. >> reporter: irs launched an investigation and so far, according to attorneys, the victims have heard nothing from the fbi. >> here we are a month and a half later, not one of our 41 clients would have filed suit in federal court against the irs and irs officials have been contacted by the fbi. >> reporter: they believe the government is slowing the investigation because it's now known senior administration officials were informed months ago when a flurry of white house meetings with irs which goesners and senior firms took place. an fbi official told fox news justice department policy prevents us from commenting on ongoing cases. as the director mentioned in his testimony, the case remains active and ongoing. but when bob muller who retires in september, testified, key not name the lead a little. >> off the top of my head, no. >> you don't know who is heading up the case?ge little. >> off the top of my head, no.
. the asymmetric warfare group. project 7116. the special security organization. the cia and fbi and nsa and all the other agencies. it took me about a year to complete a decent catalogue of the government entities and corporate entities that work in this world. >> narrator: they discovered they were the only people in the country collecting such detailed information. the only way they could verify any of it was to go there in person, hundreds of secret locations hiding in plain sight in office parks. >> priest: this is a gate to... to the nsa? >> lane: there's a government facility back in there. you'll see it better after we turn down this road. >> narrator: inside buildings like these, they launch drone strikes, gather and spread secret information, engage in cyber conflict. >> lane: you've got titan in here. csc is in one of these buildings. general dynamics. >> priest: so you really have the big mega-firms, the giants of this whole industry here: northrup grumman, boeing... >> lane: with a security station here at the front where they... they check out the cars and look underneath. >> pries
from criminal investigations by the fbi. >> you have -- excuse me. you have -- >> let me get in here. mark, to your point, what should the next step be in this congressional scrutiny of the irs particularly since acting irs chief danny wuerffel revealed the irs targets conservatives and liberal groups but it was also revealed that conservative groups were -- substantially more scrutinized than those progressive liberal groups? >> go ahead, mark. go ahead. >> i think that -- the answer to that question absolutely. there should be accountability and people should be held accountable. lois lerner has no friends on the left because as you mentioned progressives were also targeted. >> where is the proof when you have -- >> progressive things targeted and 100% of tea party and conservatives -- >> mark, yes, you had -- you had a turn. bottom line is this. the only way that we can find out the truth is -- having true transparency and that's the reason why we have hearings. and also, when -- the fbi -- went before the committee and was questioned about the fbi investigation, he didn't even kn
. >> they think that is also in just, as unjust as using drones overseas, also won just -- >> the fbi has been adept at breaking up its own terror plot. it has happened repeatedly. i am saying that seriously. there is a pattern here. sometimes they target mentally unstable individuals and tap into that instability and there are a number of cases where the individuals who go to prison for a long time are people who have serious mental challenges and the fbi will infiltrate in some cases seemed to be the ones encouraging them to plot an actual bomb attack. people contemplating some action or that they were becoming medicalized and you have an fbi informant who pops out of the scene and it's the know they have an actual plot underway and they are setting people up and part of it is creating a climate of fear, there is the demand for results but what is happening at home is deeply connected to what is going on a broad. there have been so many muslims that have been railroaded in this country and demonized and set up it is not that there aren't active terror plot. they are and i hope we do best the
in just ament. plus was is george zimmerman or trayvon martin yelling for help that night? an fbi voice analysis expert testified today. what did he think? back right after this. we're cracking down on medicare fraud. the healthcare law gives us powerful tools to fight it... to investigate it... ...prosecute it... and stop criminals. our senior medicare patrol volunteers... are teaching seniors across the country... ...to stop, spot, and report fraud. you can help. guard your medicare card. don't give out your card number over the phone. call to report any suspected fraud. we're cracking down on medicare fraud. let's make medicare stronger for all of us. >>> welcome back to "the lead." you're looking at live pictures from the courtroom in which george zimmerman is being tried for second degree murder. diane, you were talking during the break there about how the two police officers that are testifying today, officer doris singleton and then homicide detective christopher sereino that they were almost playing good cop/bad cop. >> george singleton questions zimmerman about god and killing
medal. it was this one, a fake. >> for 25 years the fbi believed shockly either kept the original or sold it. jackson's wife is outraged. >> it makes me angry that somebody would lie and cheat. for what? what is it giving him. >> reporter: in a series of phone conversations shockly repeatedly insisted he did the right thing in 1987. >> is it possible, that you give him a different medal and held on to the original? >> no. it is not. i am a christian baptist. that is the medal. the only one i have ever had. that is the one i sent him back. >> reporter: sources say the fbi is now considering the possibility that the medal shockly bought from the gun show was a fake which may mean jackson's real medal of honor is still out there somewhere. jackson, one of ten surviving world war ii medal of honor recipients is too modest to ask for its return. >> i know what i did and what i got for it. i'm proud of that. >> reporter: the fbi is hoping whoever has it will do the right thing and get it back in the hands of a true american hero. in atlanta, john roberts, fox news. >>> the congressional
correspondents in california. and a former fbi agent has testified today that he took payoffs from boston mobster whitey bulger and bulger had a few choice words in his own trial today. details on those stories tonight on the "cbs evening news" at 5:30 right after kpix 5 news. ,, ,,,,,, for our families... our neighbors... and our communities... america's beverage companies have created... a wide range of new choices. developing smaller portion sizes and more.. low and no-calorie beverages... adding clear calorie labels so you know... exactly what you're choosing... and in schools, replacing full-calorie soft drinks... with lower-calorie options. with more choices and fewer calories... supreme court: thanks. but no thanks. plus: >>> new at 6:00 tonight, why some gay couples in the bay area are sending a message to the u.s. supreme court. thanks but no thanks. >> plus -- >> i couldn't stop smiling. tired smiling at the end of the day. >> how one of yesterday's rulings means this couple won't have to say good-bye to each other. those stories and much more tonight at 6:00. >> thank you for watching
administration wants to send the fbi, but they are unable to gain access for a critical two weeks. the libyan president, angry over susan rice's false account over the attack orchestrated the delay. >> a friend of mine told me he was still steamed about the talk shows, and that negatively affected our ability to get the fbi team quickly to benghazi. >> reporter: election day, 2/3 of american voters called benghazi troubling. yet, barack obama handily wins election to a second term in the white house. the next day, a judge sends nikoula back behind bars. he remains in custody. >>> coming up, benghazi, boston and the end of the war on terror. >>> today more than half of american voters say the benghazi scandal weakened their faith in their government. what happened in benghazi and response to it may have sparked a even wider debate over the war on terrorism. >> it's not possible for americans to deploy a team of special forces to capture every trift when such an approach may be possible there are places where it would pose profound risk to our troops and local civilians. >> may 23, 2013 another
could be many years behind bars. the fbi white skol kolar crime unit dubbing the investigation operation breakfast at tiffany's. charge td with a count of wire fraud and one count of interstate transportation of stolen property. court documents reporting the 46-year-old allegedly pro cured and resold $1.2 million in diamond bracelets, earrings, rings and pendants in total about 155 pieces of jewelry she and her husband stold a diamond dealer. >> she was able to check out jewelry to take to jewelry manufactures and then, played with paper work and sold the jewelry. >> new details out this morning reveal the alleged scheme could run deeper. an fbi search of the couple's mansion in the suburb in connecticut uncovering millions more in jewelry including this 18 carat metro diamond bangle bracelet selling for $11,000. hawkin allegedly had 32 of them in the house. >> she was in a position of responsibility and it gave her a lot of latitude, i believe to keep it going court documents say she was a vice president and her rap sheet is now forever. >> thanks for joining us for abc 7 news at 4:00.
to know about. also the privacy of the jurors after their verdict. on the stand is an fbi audio expert. this is a surprising call by the state. prior to the trial he was testifying on behalf of the defense that you cannot possibly determine who is the person screaming in the background in that 911 call. what the former fbi audio expert will be saying here is we are about to see. when the defense northern mark o'mara said zimmerman was not a hothead. in 2005 there was a battery of and the defense wants the judge not to make known the identities of these jurors until six months after the case. the defense attorney mark o'mara says the jurors need to be sureth are no pro prizals against them on what could be a controversial verdict. martha: it would be argued by aexpert who that was on the tape. what can we expect today? >> reporter: we are not sure you are about it seems reasonable prosecutors have some audio analysis pertinent to their case. but we expect to see the parents of trayvon martin take the stand this week likely to identify that scream on that call as that of their son. we al
by around 30 tsa and chicago police, and she told me that i was on the no-fly list and the fbi was on their way to the airport to speak with me. >> questioned for hours and then released, he was never allowed to board his flight to washington. another american citizen, 29-year-old medical student rayhan mottwala says he was stranded overseas when he was detained in a roach-infested detention center in thailand for more than a week. officials there detained him after he refused fbi questioning without an attorney. in late june he was allowed to fly home. in both cases the men say they don't know why they weren't allowed to fly. the government won't talk about specific cases, but the fbi's website says if watch lists weren't secret, terrorist organizations would be able to circumvent the purpose of the terrorist watch list by determining in advance which of their members are likely to be questioned or detained. even after the fact, mishal has still not officially been informed he's on the no-fly list. he was told that by an airline employee. >> being a former united states marine
. >> reporter: the legal sources say the fbi originally focused on whether the stuxnet leak came from the white house. but late last year, agents started zeroing in on cartwright, who retired from the pentagon in 2011. the motives of whoever leaked remain a mystery. >> there are many reasons why people leak classified information. sometimes it's to attack a program. sometimes it's to defend it. many times we just never know. >> reporter: white house and justice department officials declined to comment on any aspect of the case, but legal sources tell nbc news that federal prosecutors have developed their case without issuing any subpoenas for phone records from "the new york times." brian? >> michael isikoff starting us off from our d.c. newsroom tonight. michael, thanks. >>> as we mentioned, this was a history-making day across town on capitol hill. as the u.s. senate finally passed a sweeping immigration reform bill, it gives hope to millions living here illegally, while it will also tighten security along the border. the vote was 68-32. nbc's kelly o'donnell covering all day, with us from th
been protected. and i think it's had devastating consequences. >> reporter: the fbi originally focused on whether the stuxnet leak came from the white house. late last year, agents started zeroing in on cartwright who had retired from the pentagon in 2011. the motives of whoever leaked remained a mystery. >> there are many reasons why people leak classified information. sometimes it's to attack a program. sometimes it's to defend it. many times we just never know. >> nbc's michael isikoff with that. justice department officials decline to comment on any aspect of this case. but legal sources tell nbc news federal prosecutors have developed their case without subpoenaing the phone records from "the new york times." >>> the fight over abortion rights in texas is getting personal. governor rick perry now injecting himself into the debate over strict abortion bill that is happening there. he publicly called out the senator who led a filibuster to kill it. speaking at the national right to life convention, the republican used state senator wendy davis' life story of being a teen mom as ammu
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